A phytochemical assessment of the antioxidant and cytotoxic properties of Helleborus odorus subsp. cyclophyllus extract

03:392 years ago

Helleborus sp. is a member of the Ranunculaceae family, and are small, perennial herbs common in Central and Southern Europe and Asia. Their distribution in Europe elevated their position in therapeutic remedies since the ancient time and mythology. Due to their potent and rich extracts from their roots, hellebores have been used in traditional and folklore remedies as they present rich sources in glycosides. Mainly, these plants have exhibited cathartic, anthelmintic and other beneficial aspects to treat diseases, however, hellebores have also been known for their adverse and poisonous aspects. It is also because of their cytotoxic aspect that these species have also been explored as alternative approaches to cancer treatment and are mainly reported as sporadic patient cases in literature. In this study, we first focused on the phytochemical characterisation of Helleborus odorus subsp. cyclophyllus combining biochemical assays and a detailed characterisation of its antioxidant and antibacterial properties. Furthermore, regarding its toxic potential, we explored the cytotoxic toxic properties and the mechanisms of toxicity mediated effects using in vitro cell systems primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). HAECs are useful for studying vascular diseases such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, and hypertension as well as for stent-graft compatibility testing and within the 3Rs principles, avoiding animals in these studies. Results showed the cytotoxic and reactive oxygen species potential of Helleborus extract in dose and time dependent manner. Further investigation (not shown here) revealed more mechanistic effects relevant to inhibition of proliferation.

Contact: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anna-Michalaki

Related

Five simple tricks for making your own video for TPI.tv
TPI.tv videos

Five simple tricks for making your own video for TPI.tv

This video shows you how to make a video yourself. It's really not that difficult! See also https://tpi.tv/how-to-submit for additional information.
01:234 years ago
EURL ECVAM
Projects and initiatives
HealthInnovationPolicy

EURL ECVAM

The EU Reference Laboratory for alternatives to animal testing (EURL ECVAM) promotes and facilitates the use of non-animal methods in testing and research. It validates, disseminates and shares knowledge on the 3Rs (Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments). In this video, Raffaella Corvi explains what EURL ECVAM does in the field of safety testing of chemicals while reducing laboratory animal testing. Watch the accessible version of the video here (https://audiovisual.ec.europa.eu/en/video/I-230374). ©European Union, 2021
02:3351 days ago
Stem cell derived Vessels-on-Chip to study brain disorders
Innovation examples
HealthIn vitroOrgan-on-Chip

Stem cell derived Vessels-on-Chip to study brain disorders

Dennis Nahon is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anatomy and Embryology at the Leiden University Medical Center. In his research, under supervision of Dr. Valeria Orlova (https://www.orlovalab.com/) and Prof. Dr. Christine Mummery, he aims to mimic a blood vessel in the brain by combining different stem cell derived cell types, in a 3D Vessel-on-Chip model. Here, an example of these in vitro blood vessels is shown in which certain brain cells known as astrocytes (in white) interact with the blood vessels (in red). This model paves the way for investigating brain vessels outside the human body, while reducing the need for animal models.
01:532 months ago
 From 2D hiPSC culture to developing a 3D vessel-on-chip
Innovation examples
In vitroOrgan-on-Chip

From 2D hiPSC culture to developing a 3D vessel-on-chip

Theano Tsikari is a 2nd year PhD student at the Orlova group at LUMC. As part of the LymphChip consortium, her project focuses on the development of immunocompetent organ-on-chip models of the cardiovascular system, and especially the integration of tissue-resident macrophages and lymphatic vasculature using human induced pluripotent stem cells. In this video, you can follow her as she presents you the backbone of her project, a 3D hiPSC-derived vessel-on-chip model, that has been previously developed in the Orlova group and can be employed for the generation of advanced in vitro models of vascular diseases.
01:292 months ago