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Respiratory toxicity using in vitro methods
Innovation examples

Respiratory toxicity using in vitro methods

The airways form a barrier for inhaled compounds, however, such compounds may cause local effects in the airways or may lead to lung diseases, such as fibrosis or COPD. Cell models of the respiratory tract, cultured at the air-liquid-interface (ALI) are a relevant model to assess the effects of inhaled compounds on the airways. Such models allow human relevant exposure, which is via the air, and assessment of effects on the epithelial cell layer. At RIVM we use air-liquid-interface cultured cell models and expose these to airborne compounds to assess the effects of agents such as nanomaterials, air pollutants or compounds from cigarette smoke. By using a mechanism-based approach to assess the effects of these compounds we invest in animal-free alternatives that better predict adverse effects in humans.
02:2410 days ago
Daniela Salvatori: TPI Utrecht
Expert interviews
HealthEducation

Daniela Salvatori: TPI Utrecht

Prof. dr. Daniela Salvatori, chair of TPI Utrecht, presents the aims of the local TPI group and invites all who want to share their ideas or questions on the transition towards animal-free innovations to get in touch via uu.nl/tpi.
02:2312 months ago
Setting up a PDXO platform of pancreatic cancer with spatial -omics characterization
Conferences abstracts

Setting up a PDXO platform of pancreatic cancer with spatial -omics characterization

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is known for its aggressive biology and lethality. Due to a low success rate of current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in clinic, there is an urgent need for preclinical research studies to investigate the underlying biology of this malignancy. This knowledge is indispensable to facilitate the development and validation of potential new therapeutic compounds. Superior to conventional biomedical research models, the focus of this study is on the development and use of a well-established patient-derived 3D in vivo model, mimicking the tumor as it is present in a human body. The development and characterization of pancreatic cancer derived organoids. This model is extensively analysed using advanced histological methods omics technology to perform tumor subtyping. 15 established PDAC organoid lines and their corresponding parental tumors are validated using immunostainings and DNA hotspot sequencing. This study is the first to show in situ detection of important driver mutations of pancreatic cancer, like KrasG12D, both in parental tumor and organoids. Additionally, specific culture conditions are defined to develop subtype-specific organoids which are validated using multiplex RNA in situ hybridization and transcriptomics. We are proud to collaborate in a fruitful international project, aiming to set-up a pre-clinical screening platform for pancreatic cancer based on patient-derived organoids -and xenografts. Altogether, spatial-omics in depth analysis of both models will demonstrate (1) high resemblance to parental tissue and (2) subtype-specific signatures associated with type of model. Ultimately, the screening platform can be used by pharmaceutical companies to facilitate oncological drug testing in a subtype specific way. Publications Ilse Rooman's lab: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34330784/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31161208/
03:2829 days ago
Cartilage-on-a-chip for studying joint degenerative diseases
Innovation examples
ToxicologyInnovationIn vitro

Cartilage-on-a-chip for studying joint degenerative diseases

Carlo Alberto Paggi is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Twente in the research group of Prof. Marcel Karperien and Prof. Séverine Le Gac. Karperien’s lab focus on the biological aspects of osteoarthritic research while Le Gac’s specialize in organ-on-chip development. The project of Carlo Alberto is developing a joint-on-chip platform to create a reliable in vitro model to study disease progression in osteo- or rheumatoid arthritis. The model combines different organ-on-chips aimed at replicating each a tissue around the joint such as cartilage, bone and ligaments. This new technology focuses on better reproducing human models and at substituting the use of animal models for drug research. If you want to know something more about the project and the groups, you can follow the link in the video. Carlo Paggi was nominated for the Hugo van Poelgeest prize for his research on a cartilage-on-a-chip model to study joint degenerative diseases Karperien’s lab of Developmental Bioengineering: https://www.utwente.nl/en/tnw/dbe/ Le Gac’s lab of Applied Microfluidics for BioEngineering Research: http://www.severinelegac.com/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carlo-alberto-paggi-76500b135/
01:586 months ago
Charlotte Blattner (Harvard Law School)
Expert interviews
Policy

Charlotte Blattner (Harvard Law School)

Charlotte Blattner (Harvard Law School, Animal Law & Policy Program)
01:0624 months ago
TPI.tv: improving science through animal-free innovations and research
Various subjects
InnovationPolicy

TPI.tv: improving science through animal-free innovations and research

Introducing TPI.tv : a video platform by experts striving to improve science through animal-free innovations and research.
01:269 months ago
Katja Wolthers (Amsterdam UMC) - virus research in human models: let's show some guts!
Innovation examples
HealthInnovation

Katja Wolthers (Amsterdam UMC) - virus research in human models: let's show some guts!

To study viruses that make people sick, we often use laboratory animals. However, virus infections in animals are different than in humans. New 3D culture models or 'organoids', which look like human organs in a petri dish, offer a unique opportunity to investigate how viruses enter the human body and cause disease. Our research focuses on enteroviruses such as polio. Due to vaccination, polio is rare, but other enteroviruses are increasingly a threat to young children and patients with impaired immune defenses. There are no medications available, because knowledge about infections with enteroviruses is limited. In our research we use organoids to see how enteroviruses enter the human body and by which means you can prevent that, without the use of laboratory animals. With this project we want to show that our technique can replace the use of laboratory animals in virus research.
02:3113 months ago
Avatar Zoo - teaching animal anatomy using virtual reality
Innovation examples
EducationInnovation

Avatar Zoo - teaching animal anatomy using virtual reality

Animals are essential to train the next generation of scientists understand diseases and develop treatments for humans as well as animals. Therefore, animals are used for educational purposes. Technologies such as Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality can be employed to reduce the number of animals in the future. Prof. Dr. Daniela Salvatori is working on the development of 'Avatar Zoo' together with UMCU and IT. Live animals are replaced by holographic 3D in this flexible platform. With these holograms one is able to study the anatomical, physiological and pathological systems and processes of all kinds of animals. Avatar Zoo won the Venture Challenge 2021 for the development of virtual reality models that can be used for anatomy classes and practical training.
02:405 months ago
Stem cell assays for animal-free developmental neurotoxicity assessment of compounds (video in Dutch)
Innovation examples
ToxicologyIn vitro

Stem cell assays for animal-free developmental neurotoxicity assessment of compounds (video in Dutch)

Victoria de Leeuw worked as a PhD candidate in the research group of prof. Aldert Piersma at the RIVM between 2016 and 2020. Piersma's lab studies the effects of compounds on development of the embryo during pregnancy with among others stem cell cultures. The project of Victoria was aimed to differentiate embryonic stem cells (of mouse and human origin) into neurons and astrocytes, which could mimic small parts of embryonic brain development. These models were able to show some of the known toxic mechanisms induced by these compounds, congruent with what they we hypothesised to mimic. Therefore, these two stem cell assays make a useful contribution to the animal-free assessment of developmental neurotoxicity potential of compounds. Onderzoeker: Victoria de Leeuw op het RIVM. Video: Sophie Koster Videoproducties
02:232 years ago
Glenn Embrechts (European Schoolnet)
Expert interviews
Education

Glenn Embrechts (European Schoolnet)

Skills in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) are becoming an increasingly important part of basic literacy in today's knowledge economy. European Schoolnet is at the forefront of the debate on how to attract more people to science and technology to address the future skills gap that Europe is facing. STEM is one of European Schoolnet's major thematic domains. We have been involved in more than 30 STEM education initiatives, financed through European Schoolnet's Ministry of Education members, industry partners, or by the European Union's funding programmes. More information on social media: Social media: https://m.facebook.com/labonderwijs and https://www.instagram.com/lab_gedrevenonderwijs/ .
02:2424 months ago
Tony Kiuru (UPM Biomedicals)
Expert interviews
HealthIn vitro

Tony Kiuru (UPM Biomedicals)

Tony Kiuru discusses GrowDex, which is an animal free, ready to use hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) and supports cell growth and differentiation with consistent results. Bridging the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies GrowDex can be used for 3D cell culture for spheroid and /organoids, in personalised medicine, regenerative medicine, organ-on-a-chip models, drug release studies, 3D printing and much more. GrowDex hydrogel is manufactured according to ISO13485. You can find more information about GrowDex at https://www.upmbiomedicals.com/siteassets/documents/growdex-brochure-2018.pdf and https://www.linkedin.com/company/growdex/ . General email address: biomedicals@upm.com.
01:1124 months ago
Whole blood assessment of thrombosis tendency
Innovation examples
HealthInnovation

Whole blood assessment of thrombosis tendency

Transgenic animals are often subjected to short and long term experimental models of thrombosis and atherosclerosis with considerable discomfort to the animal. This project aims to: 1) replace (human blood instead of animal blood), 2) reduce (a few drops of blood per test), and 3) refine (replace in vivo by in vitro testing with isolated blood) the use of laboratory animals with two new small blood volume function tests—the perfusion chamber and the thrombin generation test. Both tests will be equipped with a simple detection capability, which is affordable for laboratories. Their application is not only in the field of thrombosis and haemostasis but also for the investigation of other blood-related diseases, such as arteriosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. By Sanne Brouns (Department of Biochemistry CARIM, Maastricht University, the Netherlands) and Linda Herfs (Flowchamber B.V.).
01:2016 months ago